Your Body Has Two Brains

Your Body Has Two Brains

Your body has two brains

Yep. I just said that. Did you know that the gut is often referred to as the “second brain”?

Not specifically the gut, though you’ll hear it called that, the enteric nervous system (ENS). The “gut” is generally the “gastrointestinal tract.” The enteric nervous system is embedded in the lining of the gastrointestinal system, beginning in the esophagus and extending down to the anus.

The ENS consists of sheaths of neurons embedded in the walls of the long tube of our gut.

Simply put: Neurons line the gut. The gut contains neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters affect our brain health. Balancing neurotransmitters is a brain and body job.

Quick fact:

 The second brain contains some 500 million neurons, one two-hundredth of the number of neurons in the brain and 5x as many as the one hundred million neurons in the human spinal cord. 

Emotions and the gut

About 90 percent of the fibers in the primary visceral nerve, the vagus nerve, carry information from the gut to the brain. This has huge implications.

For one thing, people tend to associate neurotransmitters with the brain. When people talk about mental health issues such as depression, they often speak of neurotransmitters. For example, we talk about selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI medication) such as Paxil, Lexapro, Prozac, and Zoloft to treat depression.

But read this:

 95% of the body's serotonin is produced by the gut nerve cells, and every class of neurotransmitters found in the brain is also found in the gut. 

It’s a complex relationship.

Given the physical connection between the gut and the brain, it might not surprise you that our emotions are influenced by the nerves in our gut. Think “butterflies in your stomach” or that kind of anxiety, fear, or excitement (bad or good) that makes you want to vomit even if you might not be nauseated. Panic attacks. Stress diarrhea. The feeling you get when you first fall in love or when you have a crush. Antiici…..pation.

When we’re thinking about depression and other mental wellness issues, we need to look at what I call our Intake.

Food and mood

Our gut plays a prominent role. That means digestion plays a prominent role. That means that what we eat, how we eat, the combinations of foods, and eating what is right for us, affect our mental health.

Hippocrates, often referred to as “The Father of Medicine” and the author of the Hippocratic Oath that all medical practitioners take is famous for saying “All disease starts in the gut.” He also said, “Let food be thy medicine.”

Those two Hippocrates quotations alone are very telling. Disease starts in the gut, and food as medicine. What we put in our mouths can help us or harm us.

Some researchers say that up to 90 percent of all diseases can be traced in some way back to the gut and health of the microbiome (others say closer to 80%).

An aside: Bill and Ted might have invited Hippocrates back to their classroom if their project was in health class! They'd have called him “Hippo-crates,” like “So-crates” below:

(RIP, George Carlin.)

Little proteins and mood

There are two types of peptides (little proteins), specifically opioid peptides, that affect the morphine or opium receptors in the brain: Casomorphins, from the digestion of milk protein casein, and gluteomorphins derived from gliadin, one of the primary proteins found in gluten grains.

These peptides are absorbed from the gut and find their way to the brain, causing mood and behavioral problems. Gluteomorphins could also lead to the malabsorption of vitamins and minerals.

There are two ways that peptides cause problems in the brain:

  1. They look foreign, so the immune system reacts. This leads to overall inflammation which can show up as autoimmunity, autism, ADHD, depression or psychosis. The brain gets inflamed as an immune response, just as when you bump another body part, it swells.
  2. Peptides leak into the body and brain and mess up brain function like heroin or a psychedelic drug would.

Source: Mark Hyman, MD, The Ultramind Solution.

(After I learned that, I wanted to have my peptide levels tested. It’s a urine test.)

The microbiome

The microbiome is a complex internal ecosystem of microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and other) located within our bodies. In adults, microorganisms make up about 1 to 3 percent of the body's mass. That's 1.5-4.5 pounds of bacteria in a 150-pound adult or 2-6 pounds in a 200-pound adult. (Source: National Institute of Health)

The vast majority of the bacterial species that make up our microbiome live in our digestive system/gut/ENS. Adults have over 100 TRILLION microorganisms living in their gut.


A loss of microbial diversity is called “dysbiosis” – which translates to “life in distress.” As it’s understood, dysbiosis is the loss of beneficial microbes and pathogenic (bad) ones encroach. Of course, we want more good bugs than bad. When bacteria are out of balance, so are we.

It’s a global health crisis.

In The Ultramind Solution, Dr. Mark Hyman wrote that when antibiotics are used to treat harmful bacteria, depression often lifts.

Dysbiosis is related to the food we eat – not just junk food vs. health food, but quality. It’s related to the water we drink. The air we breathe. Soil contamination. Pesticides. Pollution. Chemicals. Viruses, which lead to antibiotics, which lead to superbugs and so forth.

The gut microbiome and the immune system

Most of the immune system resides in your gut. The gut microbiome and the immune system influence each other and rely on each other.

I’m often telling my partner to lay off the jujubes because they (the sugar) suppress the immune system. You know what? He’s getting over a cold that made him feel dreadful. One day he suspected that he had the flu. Another day he proclaimed pneumonia. He subsequently had a temperature of 101°F. After about 4 days of uncomfortable sickness, he was on the mend. He gave me that cold and it barely registers. Sure, I've had a couple of excruciating headaches, including one that woke me up in the middle of the night with its stabbing, searing pain, and I’m coughing up a bit of mucus, but it’s nothing compared to his experience.

Until 2 days ago I’d gone without sugar, yeast or grains for a couple of weeks. I gave up beer and ate light proteins (more on that to follow in another post). I’ve been calling it my reset diet. Then there was birthday cake. My birthday cake. I chose to allow myself a slice or two of birthday cake.

I've also been taking Vitamin D, cod liver oil and probiotics regularly.

Microbiome, microbial diversity, and allergies

Some allergic reactions happen in the brain. It’s like a runny nose but in the brain. Therefore, food allergies can cause mental symptoms, such as brain fog, anxiety or depression.

Microbial diversity in poop samples in babies can indicate allergies later on.


I've tried to keep this concise and straightforward with little jargon. I have some related posts planned that might add more relatable context to it. This piece of writing and those related ones that haven't been written yet have been rolling around in my head for almost two weeks. When I started to draft this one a few days ago, I had too many ideas to untangle. It wasn't until I started typing this one that I got into the flow and it practically wrote itself. A lesson here: Sometimes procrastination is useful.

Stay tuned.

…but I’m Neurodivergent

…but I’m Neurodivergent

This post about neurodiversity, neurodivergent, and other related terms is sort of an addendum to the post I wrote called “I am not neurotypical“, in which I explained why I don't like the terms neurotypical and atypical. The idea for that post first came to me at least five months ago, after I watched the show Atypical. I wrote the post in my head and then forgot about it until I sat down to write the piece that I intended to publish this week. That one will be up next.

My usual approach to blogging is to write to educate. This mission has been my approach for well over a decade, through every blog. Even if I'm ranting, I want you to get something out of it that's not just about me.

I didn't do any research for my Neurotypical post at all, I just let my fingers type, so forgive me if you read it and thought I was talking about of my ass. Often, I research the heck out of my posts.

After I'd finished that post, and while I was in the process of grabbing images for it, I came across two other terms, closely related to one another:


According to Autistic author Nick Walker, who knows way more about the terminology than I do, Neurodiversity is the diversity of human brains and minds. He called neurodiversity a biological fact. People are neurologically diverse.

I like this. It doesn't imply normal/abnormal, right or wrong; it says that we're all different, and we are. I know I said in my previous post that I don't like to classify people in ways that marginalize them, but this at least makes sense to me.


I like this one less.

Walker says,
Neurodivergent means having a brain that functions in ways that diverge significantly from the dominant societal standards of “normal.”

Yes, some brains do.

After some examples he says,
neurodivergence is not intrinsically positive or negative, desirable or undesirable – it all depends on what sort of neurodivergence one is talking about.

I think my issue is with the word “normal”, like “typical”.

Note, I do not disagree with Walker, at all. I'm expressing how I feel about the words. Words don't just have meaning; we have emotional connections to the words themselves. We also have reactions to the way words sound out loud. (You know what I'm talking about.)

Maybe it's my baggage from being bullied as a child or not feeling normal as a kid with undiagnosed ADD/ADHD (I got the diagnosis when I was in my 20s). Maybe it's that feeling of being marginalized that has stayed with me. We interpret the world and situations based on our experiences so far and so it makes sense that my experience up until now affects my current perception of words and concepts. I have experienced the world for 42 years as of next week.

Also, see this post from Un-boxed Brain. I found this one first, and it took me to Walker.

“I am not neurotypical”

“I am not neurotypical”

“I am not neurotypical.”

If my memory is correct, I first heard the term “neurotypical” while watching the TV show Atypical*, about a family with a teenage some who has Asperger's. Although I understood what the word meant, I looked up the definition for the sake of this post.

Google said, “not displaying or characterized by autistic or other neurologically atypical patterns of thought or behavior.”

Urban Dictionary told me that it's a word “used to describe a person who has a typical brain. This not only includes non-autistic people, but also people without mental illnesses, intellectual disabilities or any other neurological illness or disorder such as epilepsy or brain tumours.”

Between first being exposed to the term “neurotypical” and googling it, I saw it used in older articles about ADD and ADHD and other brain health conditions.


I quickly decided that I don't like the word. To me, classifying people as “neurotypical” or “atypical” indicates individuals either have a “normal” (neurotypical) brain or an abnormal one. While there is such a thing as a “healthy brain” and brain health is one of my primary areas of focus these days, I've always been bothered by classifying people in ways that marginalize them. We are all different, yes, and I believe in embracing those differences, but “neurotypical” and “atypical” make me uncomfortable.

However, humans see the world through words and classification, and I understand that it's easier to make sense of the world that way.

If a healthy brain is neurotypical and AD(H)D, depression, Alzheimer's, dementia, anxiety are all brain health issues, then people with those conditions are atypical.

Mental health=brain health

Mental health and brain health are not the same, but they are interconnected, and people often miss the “brain health” part of the picture.

I created this image in May 2017:

Labels and self-identifying

Perception is interesting. I was contacted, twice, by someone who noted that I write about disabilities. My reaction was to recoil and think, “Has this person read my website? I don't write about disabilities.” It's possible that she didn't read my website (as a longtime blogger I can tell you that it's common to receive offers from people who haven't). However, it's also possible that some people could perceive it that way.

It's not how I define myself. I don't consider myself disabled because I have ADHD. I have a different brain. That said, if I had a brain scan that was compared to the scans of others, my brain activity would differ. Of this, I have no doubt.

I was born this way, and symptoms may have been intensified by activities such as antibiotic use when I was a child (though antibiotics were probably necessary, we didn't know about probiotics), eating foods that aren't good for my gut, and other factors. The mind and body are one, which I'll discuss in my next post.

I have what I call ADD “flare-ups” when the symptoms are predominantly active, and then there are times when the symptoms are dormant. I created my PRIMED system of AD(H)D management based on what makes mine flare up and what keeps it dormant.

My different brain also contributes to anxiety and depression as well as candida flare-ups, which are common in people with AD(H)D. Fungal infections and yeast overgrowth affect the brain. Clearing that stuff up can go a long way to reduce or eliminate symptoms of ADD, depression, anxiety and other brain/mental health issues. Again, brain-body connection.

When I use the phrase “brain health” I'm talking about the physical brain. It's neurological. It involves neurotransmitters. When I talk about “mental health” it's less tangible. It's more the affect of stress, which can be environmental, social or physical.

A healthy brain relies on the right nutrition, feeding it what it needs both in the form of whole foods and supplements, and water. It relies on physical exercise. A healthy mind is aided by thoughts, brain exercises, meditation, routines and the right environment. Both a healthy brain and a healthy mind rely on downtime and rest.

You'll learn more about this from me over time. Without intending to, I've just described my PRIMED system for bringing your life into balance so that you can achieve harmony.

There's more to come.

Taking it back to the term “neurotypical”

As I was finishing this post I came across a term that I do like. I will save that for another day.

*Find it. Watch it. I don't know how realistic it portrays Asperger's because I don't have experience with it, but by the end, I saw it as a show about a family. Asperger's was secondary.