Recently I had one of those instances where I looked in the fridge and cupboards and they all seemed bare. I didn't want to order in or go out, so I decided to make one of my “clean the pantry” meals. It was either going to be rice and beans, or some other sort of grain and beans. I had lots of buckwheat even though I don't like buckwheat. I chose the buckwheat.

Beans are full of protein and fiber.

I'm still on a turmeric kick. Turmeric has been a repetitive presence in my blog and Instagram posts. I credit it for me not getting sick when my partner was sick, and then when I did get that cold it was mild and short. I bought new boxes of Kleenex (really the Kleenex brand – I'm loving the “Ultra Soft 3-ply”) thinking that I'd run out of my 2 open boxes at home quickly, but the nose blowing was less frequent than expected. It was mostly a chest cold, with sinus pain and some nasal congestion.

Here's my rationale behind the rest of the ingredients:

  • The mixed vegetables were for variety and crunch. You can use them, or not.
  • The wakame was added 1) because I really like wakame and 2) Because wakame is said to mitigate the gas problem caused by beans. You know how the rhymes go: “Beans beans are good for your heart, the more you eat them, the more you fart.” and “beans beans the magical fruit, the more you eat them the more you toot.”
    I ate this salad twice and the first time the wakame defense failed miserably. The next day my ass was like a wind machine. However, I added tuna to the leftovers and farts were minimal so either my stomach was used to all that fiber, or the added tuna helped. The nutritional benefits of wakame were secondary to me, but here they are:

    • Wakame is a good source of magnesium, which I've been trying to get enough of. Every cell of the body relies on magnesium and people tend to be deficient. Magnesium is integral to hundreds of biochemical reactions across all bodily systems and it's depleted every 12 hours so it needs to be constantly replenished. If you're feeling “off” try increasing your magnesium intake.
    • Wakame is a good source of iodine, essential for strong metabolism of cells, and also iron, manganese, folate and bioavailable calcium.
    • It's rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, essential for brain health.
    • It's a good source of a number of vitamins including A, B2, C, E, and K and vitamin D, which isn't a vitamin, but a hormone.
    • It's got a ton of health benefits including boosting immune function. Combine wakame with immune boosting turmeric, plus pepper and fat to maximize the benefits of turmeric, and you've got an immune system powerhouse. Turmeric might play a role in thyroid health. For more information about thyroid health, check out The Thyroid Secret, a documentary series that runs from March 1 – 10.
  • I really wanted apple cider vinegar, lemon juice and turmeric together. If you prefer a sweeter dressing you could add maple syrup or honey, but I prefer my dressing unsweetened.

Here's the recipe:

Almond Crusted Salmon
Recipe: Almond-Crusted Salmon
Print Recipe
This salmon dish is packed with brain-boosting nutrition.
Servings
2 pieces
Servings
2 pieces
Almond Crusted Salmon
Recipe: Almond-Crusted Salmon
Print Recipe
This salmon dish is packed with brain-boosting nutrition.
Servings
2 pieces
Servings
2 pieces
Ingredients
Servings: pieces
Instructions
  1. In a food processor or food chopper, chop the nuts and seeds until they are fine. This is the coating. The finer you get the mixture, the more likely it is to stick to the fish.
  2. Add the lemon zest and give it another pulse to mix.
  3. Rinse the salmon and pat dry.
  4. Put some coating on a plate.
  5. Dredge each side of the salmon, patting the coating on if that helps it stick.
  6. Heat 1-2 tbsp of coconut oil or olive oil in a pan over medium heat (amount depends on the size of the pan you're using)
  7. Cook the salmon for 4-5 minutes per side.
  8. Serve over greens, such as spring mix, that's been drizzled with juice from the lemon you zested (1/2 a lemon should be enough, but you decide how wet you want it). You can also add a drizzle of sesame oil.
Recipe Notes
  • You could start with almond meal or almond flour. I didn't have any.
  • You could use whatever seeds you'd like. Chia seeds and/or sunflower seeds would probably work. My intuition guided me to hemp and pumpkin.
  • You could replace the almonds with pecans or other nuts of choice (not peanuts).
  • I ended up with enough coating for two servings, even though I'd only thawed one piece of fish, so I've got leftover coating for the next time. If you end up with more coating than you need, you can use it on salmon in the future, or use it as a topping for salad or yogurt. If you're not going to use the ground nuts and seeds in the next couple of days, freeze the leftovers. They could go rancid.
  • I didn't use the best quality salmon (it was a frozen fillet from a box, bought at a grocery store) but the execution was nearly perfect. I say "nearly" because I didn't chop the nuts finely enough.

See this post for nutrition notes.

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